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The third generation of video games (1983–1992) includes the Nintendo Entertainment System, Sega Master System and Atari 7800.

Sales figures

See also: List of best-selling game consoles

Worldwide

System Worldwide Japan Americas Elsewhere
Nintendo
Entertainment System

(Famicom)
61.91 million
(2009)[1][2]
19.35 million
(2009)[1]
34 million (1996)[1]
(United States: 33.29 million (1993),[3]
Other: 710,000)
8.56 million (1996)[1]
(Europe: 3.5 million (1992),[4]
South Korea: 360,000 (1993)[5])
Sega
Master System

(Mark III)
19.39 million
(2012)
1.72 million
(1989)[6]
10 million (2016)
(Brazil: 8 million (2016),[7]
United States: 2 million (1992)[8])
7.67 million (1993)
(Western Europe:
6.95 million (1993),[9]
South Korea:
720,000 (1993)[5])
Atari 7800 1 million (1988)[10]
Sega SG-1000
(Mark II)
2 million
(1996)[11]
720,000
(1985)[12]
Daewoo Zemmix
(MSX-based console)
415,000
(1990)[5]
South Korea:
415,000 (1990)[5]
Super Cassette Vision 330,000
(1986)
300,000
(1986)[13]
France:
30,000 (1986)[3]
Atari XEGS 130,000
(1989)
United States:
100,000 (1988)[14]
France:
30,000 (1989)[3]
Sega SC-3000
(computer)
120,000
(1983)[15]
Atari ST
(computer)
100,000
(1985)[16]
United States:
50,000 (1985)[16]
50,000
(1985)

Japan

The cumulative (including annual) sales figures for Japan:

Year Sales
Nintendo Famicom Sega SG-1000 Epoch
SCV
Famicom [12] FDS Modem Sega SG-1000 [12] Mark III
1983 450,000 200,000
1984 2,100,000
(+1,650,000)
440,000
(+240,000)
1985 6,600,000[17][18]
(+4,500,000)
(95% market)[19]
720,000
(+280,000)
370,000[20] 90,000[20]
1986 10,500,000
(+3,900,000)
2,500,000[21] 1,000,000[22]
(+630,000)
300,000[13]
(+210,000)
1987 12,280,000
(+1,780,000)
1,280,000
(+280,000)[12]
1988 13,870,000
(+1,590,000)
(90% market)[23]
100,000[24] 1,520,000
(+240,000)[12]
1989 15,390,000
(+1,520,000)
150,000[25]
(+50,000)
1,720,000
(+200,000)[12]
1990 16,750,000
(+1,360,000)
2,440,000
1991 17,390,000[3]
(+640,000)
1992 18,130,000
(+790,000)[3]
(40% of Japan homes)[26]
1993 18,600,000[3]
(+470,000)
1994 18,870,000
(+80,000)[27]
1995 18,950,000[27]
(+70,000)
1996 19,020,000
(+60,000)[1]
1997 19,050,000
(+30,000)[1]
1998 19,100,000
(+50,000)[1]
1999 19,150,000
(+50,000)[1]
2000 19,200,000
(+50,000)[1]
2001 19,260,000
(+60,000)[1]
2002 19,320,000
(+60,000)[1]
2003 19,350,000
(+30,000)[1]
4,500,000[28]

United States

The cumulative (including annual) sales figures for the United States:

Year Sales
Nintendo
Entertainment System
Sega
Master System
Atari
7800 XEGS
1985 90,000 (NYC)[29][30]
1986 1,100,000
(+1,100,000)[31][32][18]
(+$310 million)
(73% market)[33]
125,000[31] 100,000[31][34]
1987 4,100,000
(+3,000,000)[35][36]
(+$1 billion)[37][38]
(70% market)[39]
625,000
(+500,000)[3]
(10% market)[40]
100,000[14]
1988 11,100,000
(+7,000,000)[41]
(+$1.7 billion)[37][42]
(75-85% market)[43][44]
953,000
(+328,000)
(+$94.3 million)
(4.1% market)[42]
< 1,000,000[10]
1989 20,300,000
(+9,200,000)[45][46]
(79-90% market)[47][48]
1990 27,500,000
(+7,200,000)[49][50]
(85-90% market)[51][49]
1991 31,900,000[52][3][53]
(+4,400,000)
2,000,000[8]
1992 33,290,000[3]
(+1,390,000)
(33% of US homes)[26]

Western Europe

The cumulative (including annual) sales figures for Western Europe:

Year Sales
NES [3] SMS SCV XEGS
1986 30,000[3]
1987 300,000 155,000[3]
1988 350,000[3]
(+195,000)
1989 1,000,000 700,000
(+350,000)[3]
30,000[3]
1990 1,655,000
(+655,000)
1,425,000[3]
(+725,000)
1991 3,840,000[54]
(+2,415,000)
1992 3,500,000[4] 6,200,000[55]
(+2,360,000)
1993 6,950,000
(+750,000)

The regional sales figures for Western Europe:

Nation(s) Sales
NES SMS [54] SCV [3] XEGS [3]
France 1,600,000 30,000 30,000
United Kingdom 1,500,000[56]
Germany 700,000
Spain 550,000
Italy 400,000
Belgium 600,000
Netherlands 200,000
Others 1,400,000
Platform Total 3,500,000[4] 6,950,000 30,000 30,000

References

  1. 1.00 1.01 1.02 1.03 1.04 1.05 1.06 1.07 1.08 1.09 1.10 1.11 Consolidated Sales Transition by Region (PDF). Nintendo (2010-01-27). Archived from the original on 2010-02-14. Retrieved on 2010-02-14.
  2. NES. Classic Systems. Nintendo. Archived from the original on 2007-08-04. Retrieved on 2007-12-04.
  3. 3.00 3.01 3.02 3.03 3.04 3.05 3.06 3.07 3.08 3.09 3.10 3.11 3.12 3.13 3.14 3.15 3.16 3.17 Sales figures from magazine scans
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 https://archive.org/stream/Game_Over_1999_Cyberactive_Publishing#page/n425/mode/2up
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 5.3 Game World (South Korea)
  6. Sega Mark III:
  7. Azevedo, Théo (May 12, 2016). Console em produção há mais tempo, Master System já vendeu 8 mi no Brasil (Portuguese). Universo Online. Retrieved on May 13, 2016. “Comercializado no Brasil desde setembro de 1989, o saudoso Master System já vendeu mais de 8 milhões de unidades no país, segundo a Tectoy.”
  8. 8.0 8.1 Sheff, David (1993). Game Over (1st ed. ed.). New York: Random House. p. 349. ISBN 0-679-40469-4. https://archive.org/stream/Game_Over_1999_Cyberactive_Publishing#page/n357/mode/2up. Retrieved 16 January 2012.
  9. Western Europe
  10. 10.0 10.1 Press Release, Atari (June 1, 1988)
  11. http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=6CS7AAAAIAAJ&q=sg-1000
  12. 12.0 12.1 12.2 12.3 12.4 12.5 Hardware Shipments (Japan)
  13. 13.0 13.1 Epoch Japanese Hardware
  14. 14.0 14.1 http://www.atarimagazines.com/v7n1/marketplace.html
  15. http://i.imgur.com/3sBZ9Lz.jpg
  16. 16.0 16.1 http://mcurrent.name/atarihistory/tramel_technology.html
  17. http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1301&dat=19860407&id=apAyAAAAIBAJ&sjid=MegDAAAAIBAJ&pg=2107,4408710
  18. 18.0 18.1 https://archive.org/stream/06Kahle001551#page/n5/mode/2up
  19. http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=2209&dat=19860608&id=PborAAAAIBAJ&sjid=SPwFAAAAIBAJ&pg=3978,2380436
  20. 20.0 20.1 http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:poA6dh5qvgIJ:ousar.lib.okayama-u.ac.jp/file/40488/oer_037_1_063_088.pdf
  21. https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=RI51dkpbcGoC&pg=PA34
  22. Nihon Kōgyō Shinbunsha (1986). "Amusement". Business Japan (Nihon Kogyo Shimbun) 31 (7-12): 89. (Link)
  23. http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1876&dat=19881113&id=YeoeAAAAIBAJ&sjid=lc4EAAAAIBAJ&pg=6700,5100300
  24. http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1876&dat=19881113&id=YeoeAAAAIBAJ&sjid=lc4EAAAAIBAJ&pg=6700,5100300
  25. http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1243&dat=19890813&id=85BTAAAAIBAJ&sjid=yYYDAAAAIBAJ&pg=6774,717076
  26. 26.0 26.1 https://archive.org/stream/Game_Over_1999_Cyberactive_Publishing#page/n427/mode/2up
  27. 27.0 27.1 Famitsu, Issue 392, Page 8 (March 1996)
  28. http://arstechnica.com/gaming/2013/07/time-to-feel-old-inside-the-nes-on-its-30th-birthday/2/
  29. http://elafountain.escalonimaginario.com/comeback.html
  30. http://www.nytimes.com/1986/09/27/business/video-games-once-zapped-in-comeback.html
  31. 31.0 31.1 31.2 Computer Entertainer, February 1987, page 13
  32. http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1350&dat=19870228&id=ChNPAAAAIBAJ&sjid=4AIEAAAAIBAJ&pg=7027,7957469
  33. http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1665&dat=19890730&id=qKIbAAAAIBAJ&sjid=R04EAAAAIBAJ&pg=5459,6856521
  34. Computer Entertainer, December 1986, page 8
  35. http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1314&dat=19880409&id=klpWAAAAIBAJ&sjid=mu8DAAAAIBAJ&pg=4634,5262094
  36. https://archive.org/stream/06Kahle001551#page/n7/mode/2up
  37. 37.0 37.1 http://vidgame.info/vid1987.htm
  38. http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1454&dat=19881121&id=Qb8sAAAAIBAJ&sjid=uyYEAAAAIBAJ&pg=6937,3445595
  39. http://www.nytimes.com/1988/12/04/business/nintendo-scores-big.html?pagewanted=2
  40. "Video Games". Los Angeles Times. June 13, 1988. http://articles.latimes.com/1988-06-13/business/fi-3249_1_video-game-systems. Retrieved 16 January 2012.
  41. http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1243&dat=19890622&id=kZBTAAAAIBAJ&sjid=x4YDAAAAIBAJ&pg=5094,956076
  42. 42.0 42.1 http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1310&dat=19881208&id=hvFVAAAAIBAJ&sjid=yuEDAAAAIBAJ&pg=6835,2121822
  43. http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1901&dat=19890526&id=AIgfAAAAIBAJ&sjid=tNIEAAAAIBAJ&pg=3930,7137789
  44. http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=861&dat=19881121&id=xjRSAAAAIBAJ&sjid=MjYNAAAAIBAJ&pg=2041,4303690
  45. http://www.nytimes.com/1990/12/08/business/waiting-for-the-zapping-of-nintendo.html?pagewanted=2
  46. http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1350&dat=19891224&id=hktQAAAAIBAJ&sjid=AQ4EAAAAIBAJ&pg=6439,3430124
  47. https://archive.org/stream/06Kahle001568#page/n0/mode/2up
  48. https://web.archive.org/web/20150219225357/http://vidgame.info/vid1989.htm
  49. 49.0 49.1 https://web.archive.org/web/20150102192032/http://vidgame.info/vid1990.htm
  50. http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1499&dat=19911217&id=MTAgAAAAIBAJ&sjid=RiwEAAAAIBAJ&pg=2101,1140372
  51. http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1309&dat=19940303&id=LdBOAAAAIBAJ&sjid=cBMEAAAAIBAJ&pg=3371,1240681
  52. http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1356&dat=19920110&id=IV0xAAAAIBAJ&sjid=TgcEAAAAIBAJ&pg=3802,6316567
  53. http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=puMDAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA75
  54. 54.0 54.1 "Active installed base estimates". Screen Digest. Screen Digest. March 1995. p. 60. (cf. here, here, and here)
  55. 1992-1997 hardware sales from magazine scans
  56. UK Installed Bases (EA)



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